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In Next Month's TVR



___________________ Featured in Next Month's TVR ___________________

 

Valerie Collins

Valerie Collins
The wealth of polysemous words in English may be the bane of foreign learners, but the effortless ease with which they can be used to create humor and irony makes them the mainstay of subeditors, songwriters, ad people — everyone in fact who needs to think up attention-catching language. Puns, paragrams and other forms of word play are pressed into service anywhere and everywhere — book titles and newspaper headlines, product and store names, billboards and T-shirts, stickers and badges.


Christopher Orlet

Christopher Orlet
With few exceptions, the last words of history's great names have been about as interesting and enlightening as a soap commercial. While we expect pearls of profundity and motivational aphorism from our expiring artists, philosophers, and world leaders, more often we are left with dry-as-dust clichés. But is it fair to expect deep insights into life's mysteries when the dying clearly have other things on their mind — hell, for instance, or unspeakable pain?


Susan Elkin

Susan Elkin
How many school children now read the most important book — or collection of books — ever published in English? Very few, I suspect.

The King James Bible, like The Odyssey and The Iliad of Homer, is an astonishing and timeless account of a mythology that has touched, eased, and educated generation after generation for thousands of years. It underpins our literature, language, culture, and thought across the entire English-speaking world.



The March issue of The Vocabula Review is due online March 17.


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