About TVR  |  Site Index  |  Advertising in TVR  |  Subscribe to TVR  |  Donate to TVR  |  Search TVR  |  TVR Audio  |  TVR Forum
TVR Home > In Next Month's TVR Contact TVR

In Next Month's TVR



___________________ Featured in Next Month's TVR ___________________

 

Darren Crovitz

Darren Crovitz
All readers and writers are interested to some degree in the nuts and bolts of language. Sure, when we read, there are larger things we're looking for — a controlled focus, cohesive organization, an engaging style. But for each of us, there are certain issues of diction, syntax, grammar, punctuation, and usage that snag our attention, like thorns snatching and unraveling a sweater. One of those pet peeves for me is hyphens. Or rather, the lack of them.


Clark Elder Morrow

Clark Elder Morrow
Back in the old days (the 1940s), when warfare was thought of as something rather imposing and inspiring, the code names given to military operations reflected the fact that war was also considered a fierce, competitive, and youthful enterprise. If Hollywood had "faces" back then, the military — when it came to their World War II exploits — had great names: Operation Torch, for example, or Operation Overlord. Overlord. Now there's a name a band of brothers engaged in life-or-death activities could be proud of.


Joseph Epstein

Joseph Epstein
My efficient editor at Houghton Mifflin has just sent me an email informing me that finished copies of a new book I have written will come off the press on May 31, with books to be shipped to book stores on June 6, after which I shall receive my author's shipment of — if I remember correctly — twenty copies. The physical object, the artifact, the commodity, the actual book at long last will appear. This ought to be a pleasing moment, and for the vast most part it is. But in smaller part it presents complications.


Konstantin Kakaes

Konstantin Kakaes
It is too easy to criticize President Bush for his abuse of language: "we're making the right decisions to bring the solution to an end," he once said, proving George Orwell's point that: "[language] becomes ugly and inaccurate because our thoughts are foolish, but the slovenliness of our language makes it easier for us to have foolish thoughts." Such off-the-cuff "Bushisms" abound, and perhaps we must resign ourselves to them — in consolation, they often contain unintended kernels of truth. Less entertaining, and more dangerous, is the deliberate rhetoric of the Bush administration, where poor language is altogether more worrisome. Fretting over this may sound a fool's errand, and perhaps it is. But I believe that asking that our leaders think clearly, and convey their thoughts openly, is not too much to ask, for when they do not, as in the Vietnam War, the consequences are indeed horrible.



The June issue of The Vocabula Review is due online June 16.


_____________________________________________________________________

 

Back one page Print this page
About TVR  |  Site Index  |  Advertising in TVR  |  Subscribe to TVR  |  Donate to TVR  |  Search TVR  |  TVR Audio  |  TVR Forum


.TVR Home


Copyright © 1999-2002 Vocabula Communications Company. All rights reserved.
No material from this site may be used or reproduced without permission.
Vocabula is a registered service mark of Vocabula Communications Company.
Grumbling About Grammar is a registered service mark of Vocabula Communications Company.
TVR signature tune copyright © 2001 Vocabula Communications Company. All rights reserved.